Charles C. W. Cooke

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Charles C. W. Cooke
Born (1984-11-04) 4 November 1984 (age 34)
Cambridge, United Kingdom
NationalityBritish
CitizenshipUnited States
Alma materUniversity of Oxford
OccupationWriter, broadcaster
Years active2011–present
Spouse(s)Kathryn Murdock (m. 2014)
Children2

Charles C. W. Cooke (born 4 November 1984) is the editor of NationalReview.com, formerly known as National Review Online. He took the role over after Rich Lowry stepped down in June 2016 (Lowry remains the editor-in-chief of National Review).[1] Cooke is the author of The Conservatarian Manifesto[2] and a frequent guest on HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher.[3][4][5] In addition to National Review, he has written for the New York Times,[6][7] the Washington Post,[8] and the Los Angeles Times.[9][10] Along with Kevin D. Williamson, he hosts the popular Mad Dogs and Englishmen[11] podcast. Cooke has been described by The Atlantic as "perhaps the most confident defender of conservatism younger than George Will"[12] and "a principled conservative who is allergic to anything resembling groupthink."[13]

Political views[edit]

A "conservatarian," Cooke is known for his outspoken criticism of populists such as Donald Trump[14][15] and Sarah Palin,[16] for his opposition to censorship[17] and gun control,[18] for his support for more robust federalism,[19][20] for his disdain for the “imperial presidency,”[21] and for his objections to the politicization of popular science.[22][23] On many issues, Cooke leans libertarian, such as his support for legalizing marijuana (and all other drugs),[24] prostitution,[25] and same-sex marriage,[26] and his opposition to both the Patriot Act[27] and the National Security Agency's metadata collection program.[28][29] A staunch advocate of the right to keep and bear arms, he has described the "collective right" theory of the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution as "utterly farcical"[30] and "the legal equivalent of Moon landing trutherism."[31] Cooke is a constitutional originalist[32] and a critic of the administrative state.[33] He opposes the death penalty.[34]

Cooke has been frequently critical of the conservative movement's blind-spot on race. In 2015, he wrote that slavery and segregation "presented challenges that eclipsed those that were posed during the Revolution ... the crime of the British in America was to deny British conceptions of good government to a people who had become accustomed to it, and to do so capriciously. The crime of white supremacy in the South was, in the words of Ida B. Wells, to 'cut off ears, toes, and fingers, strips off flesh, and distribute portions' of any person whom the majority disliked, and to do so in many cases as a matter of established public policy."[35] In an essay the previous year, Cooke noted that "for most of America's story, an entire class of people was, as a matter of course, enslaved, beaten, lynched, subjected to the most egregious miscarriages of justice, and excluded either explicitly or practically from the body politic. We prefer today to reserve the word 'tyranny' for its original target, King George III, or to apply it to foreign despots. But what other characterization can be reasonably applied to the governments that, ignoring the words of the Declaration of Independence, enacted and enforced the Fugitive Slave Act? How else can we see the men who crushed Reconstruction? How might we view the recalcitrant American South in the early 20th century? 'It' did 'happen here.' "[36]

Education[edit]

Cooke is a graduate of the University of Oxford, where he studied Modern History and Politics under Gillian Peele and Clive Holmes at Lady Margaret Hall.[37][38] Before attending Oxford, he was educated at King's College School, Cambridge, and Kimbolton School.[39]

Personal life[edit]

Cooke and his sister[40] grew up in Hemingford Abbots, a small village outside of Cambridge, England.[41] He immigrated to the United States in 2011.[42] He became a naturalized US citizen on February 23, 2018.[43] He currently lives in Florida with his wife and two sons. Although his wife is Catholic,[44] Cooke openly describes himself as an atheist.[45] Cooke is a fluent French speaker and a self-confessed "Francophile."[46]

Works[edit]

  • Cooke, Charles C. W. The Conservatarian Manifesto: Libertarians, Conservatives, and the Fight for the Right's Future. New York, Crown Forum, 2015. ISBN 9780804139724

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Charles C. W. Cooke named Online editor at National Review". Politico. Retrieved 18 June 2016.
  2. ^ "Conservatarians Welcome Both Cowboys, Community". RealClearPolitics. Retrieved 28 June 2016.
  3. ^ "National Review Writer Tells Joy Reid That Mentioning Slavery Is 'Cheap' Point, Slavery A 'Flaw'". mediaite.com. Retrieved 28 June 2016. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |website= (help)
  4. ^ "Bill Maher Confronts Maddow over MSNBC's Christie Hysteria: 'It's Not Watergate!'". mediaite.com. Retrieved 28 June 2016. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |website= (help)
  5. ^ "Bill Maher Mocks Trump Campaign Effort to Change His Public Image". mediaite.com. Retrieved 28 June 2016. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |website= (help)
  6. ^ Cooke, Charles C. W. "Do Black People Have Equal Gun Rights?". Retrieved 31 December 2016.
  7. ^ "Making Gun Use Safer". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 31 December 2016.
  8. ^ Cooke, Charles C. W. (9 December 2015). "The right to bear arms isn't up for debate". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 31 December 2016.
  9. ^ Cooke, Charles C. W. "Post election, progressives are embracing conservative traditions". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 31 December 2016.
  10. ^ Cooke, Charles C. W. "Guns and the no-fly list: Whatever happened to due process?". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 31 December 2016.
  11. ^ "Mad Dogs and Englishmen Archives". Ricochet. Retrieved 31 December 2016.
  12. ^ Friedersdorf, Conor. "Can Conservative Journalism Survive Populism?". The Atlantic. Retrieved 12 November 2017.
  13. ^ Friedersdorf, Conor. "Donald Trump Eats First". The Atlantic. Retrieved 13 January 2018.
  14. ^ "National Review Reporter Confronts Coulter, Hannity on Support for Trump: 'I Am Just Astonished'". The Blaze. 13 August 2015. Retrieved 28 June 2016.
  15. ^ Wemple, Erik (22 January 2016). "National Review's Charles Cooke rips Trump over 'failing publication' tweet". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 28 June 2016.
  16. ^ "Conservatives to Palin: We're over you". The Washington Post. Retrieved 28 June 2016.
  17. ^ "Free Speech without Apologies". National Review. Retrieved 31 December 2016.
  18. ^ "Challenged By National Review Reporter, Halperin Can't Offer Single Policy Solution To Gun Violence". The Washington Free Beacon. Retrieved 28 June 2016.
  19. ^ Cooke, Charles C. W. (10 March 2015). The Conservatarian Manifesto: Libertarians, Conservatives, and the Fight for the Right's Future. Crown Publishing Group. ISBN 9780804139731.
  20. ^ John Locke Foundation (18 May 2015), National Review's Charles Cooke touts value of federalism, retrieved 1 January 2017
  21. ^ Cooke, Charles C. W. "Outraged by Trump's trade war? Tell Congress to take back its tariff power". latimes.com. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  22. ^ North, Anna. "What Happens When You Mess With Nerds". The New York Times. Retrieved 28 June 2016.
  23. ^ "A liberal nerd 'problem'". BBC News. Retrieved 28 June 2016.
  24. ^ "Charles C. W. Cooke on Twitter". Twitter. Retrieved 6 April 2017.[non-primary source needed]
  25. ^ "Legalize Prostitution". National Review. Retrieved 20 January 2018.
  26. ^ "A Few Thoughts on Today's Obergefell Supreme Court Decision". National Review. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  27. ^ "The IRS's Curious Immunity". National Review. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  28. ^ "Liberty in the Tentacular State". National Review. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  29. ^ "NSA Critics, Right All Along". National Review. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  30. ^ "Even Obama Understands the Second Amendment". National Review. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  31. ^ "Slate Goes All in on Second Amendment Trutherism". National Review. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  32. ^ Cooke, Charles C. W. (6 April 2017). The Conservatarian Manifesto: Libertarians, Conservatives, and the Fight for the Right's Future. Crown Publishing Group. ISBN 9780804139748.
  33. ^ "Our Presidents Are Beginning to Act Like Kings". National Review. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  34. ^ "Against Capital Punishment | National Review". National Review. 8 May 2014. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  35. ^ "The GOP's Conspicuous Absence from Selma". National Review. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  36. ^ "The Great Equalizer". National Review. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  37. ^ Cooke, Charles C. W. (10 March 2015). The Conservatarian Manifesto: Libertarians, Conservatives, and the Fight for the Right's Future. Crown Publishing Group. ISBN 9780804139731.
  38. ^ "Charles C. W. Cooke". National Review. Retrieved 31 December 2016.
  39. ^ "Café Americano // Of Mixtapes and the Wireless". us11.campaign-archive1.com. Retrieved 31 December 2016.
  40. ^ "Of Grapes and Gaul". National Review. 17 November 2018.
  41. ^ "A Day for Remembering Not to Forget". National Review. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  42. ^ Leibovich, Interview By Mark (18 March 2015). "Charles C. W. Cooke Can Fend for Himself". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 18 June 2016.
  43. ^ "My American Dream". National Review. Retrieved 23 February 2018.
  44. ^ "Charles C. W. Cooke on Twitter". Twitter. Retrieved 31 December 2016.[non-primary source needed]
  45. ^ "Yes, Atheism and Conservatism Are Compatible". National Review. Retrieved 31 December 2016.
  46. ^ "Charles C.W. Cooke on Brexit, #NeverTrump, and the Future of National Review: New at Reason". 10 August 2016.