Portal:Yorkshire

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The Yorkshire Portal

Yorkshire (/ˈjɔːrkʃər, -ʃɪər/; abbreviated Yorks), formally known as the County of York, is a historic county of Northern England and the largest in the United Kingdom. Because of its great size in comparison to other English counties, functions have been undertaken over time by its subdivisions, which have also been subject to periodic reform. Throughout these changes, Yorkshire has continued to be recognised as a geographical territory and cultural region. The name is familiar and well understood across the United Kingdom and is in common use in the media and the military, and also features in the titles of current areas of civil administration such as North Yorkshire, South Yorkshire, West Yorkshire and East Riding of Yorkshire.

Within the borders of the historic county of Yorkshire are vast stretches of unspoiled countryside. This can be found in the Yorkshire Dales and North York Moors and with the open aspect of some of the major cities. Yorkshire has also been nicknamed "God's Own County".

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Aerial view of York

York is a walled city, situated at the confluence of the Rivers Ouse and Foss in North Yorkshire, England. The city has a rich heritage and provided the backdrop to major political events throughout much of its two millennia of existence.

The city was founded by the pre-Roman Brythonic people and named Eborakon meaning "place of the yew trees", and later called Eboracum in 71 AD by the Romans who made it the capital of their Province of Britannia Inferior. At the end of Roman rule in 415 AD the settlement was taken over by the Angles and the city was renamed Eoforwic. It served as the capital of the Anglian Kingdom of Northumbria. When the Vikings captured the city in 866 AD they renamed it Jórvík and it became the capital of a wider kingdom of the same name covering much of Northern England. After the Norman Conquest, the name "York", which was first used in the 13th century, gradually evolved. In the Middle Ages York grew as a major wool trading centre and the ecclesiastical capital of the northern province of England. The Province of York is still one of the two Church of England ecclesiastical provinces, alongside that of Canterbury.

York's location on the River Ouse, in the centre of the Vale of York and half way between the capitals of London and Edinburgh means that it has long had a significant position in the nation's transport system. The 19th century saw York, under the influence of George Hudson, become an important hub of the railway network and a manufacturing centre. In recent decades the economy of York has moved from being dominated by its confectionery and railway-related industries to one that provides services. The University of York and health services have become major employers. Tourism also boosts the local economy because the city offers a wealth of historic attractions, of which York Minster is the most prominent, and a variety of cultural activities. York Racecourse and Kit Kat Crescent, the home of York City F.C., are the most prominent sporting venues in the city and the River Ouse provides opportunities for both sporting and leisure pursuits. (read more . . . )

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Paulinusofyork.jpg

Paulinus (died 10 October 644) was a Roman missionary and the first Bishop of York. A member of the Gregorian mission sent in 601 by Pope Gregory I to Christianize the Anglo-Saxons from their native Anglo-Saxon paganism, Paulinus arrived in England by 604 with the second missionary group. Little is known of Paulinus' activities in the following two decades.

After some years spent in Kent, perhaps in 625, Paulinus was consecrated a bishop. He accompanied Æthelburg of Kent, sister of King Eadbald of Kent, on her journey to Northumbria to marry King Edwin of Northumbria, and eventually succeeded in converting Edwin to Christianity. Paulinus also converted many of Edwin's subjects and built some churches. One of the women Paulinus baptised was a future saint, Hilda of Whitby. Following Edwin's death in 633, Paulinus and Æthelburg fled Northumbria, leaving behind a member of Paulinus' clergy, James the Deacon. Paulinus returned to Kent, where he became Bishop of Rochester. After his death in 644, Paulinus was venerated as a saint. (read more . . . )

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Hull City players and staff celebrate promotion to the Premier League for the first time in their history, which was achieved after victory in the 2008 Football League Championship play-off Final.

List of Hull City A.F.C. seasonsHull City A.F.C., an English association football club based in Kingston upon Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, was founded in 1904. The team's first competitive matches came in the FA Cup, being beaten 4–1 by Stockton in a replay following a 3–3 draw, before they were elected to the Football League Second Division ahead of the 1905–06 season. Since their election to the Football League in 1905, Hull have spent two seasons in the first tier, 56 in the second, 30 in the third and 10 in the fourth. The table details Hull City's achievements in senior first team competition from the 1904–05 season to the end of the most recently completed season. (read more . . . )

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View from the Mount hill overlooking the village of Jackson Bridge in the upper Holme Valley, West Yorkshire, England.
Credit: Richard Harvey
View from the Mount hill overlooking the village of Jackson Bridge in the upper Holme Valley in West Yorkshire. Looking down the hill the settlements shown are, Butterley to the left of centre, up and to the left is Totties, right and down from there is New Mill. From there forward and left is Lydgate which evolves into Wooldale before disappearing over the hill and down into Holmfirth. To the right of New Mill are to Honley and Crosland Moor. In the centre back the white building is Huddersfield Royal Infirmary located in Marsh. Beyond that is Halifax and off to the right is Bradford. (Read more...)

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Places: BarnoldswickBradfordDoncasterHalifaxHarrogateHuddersfieldHullLeedsMiddlesbroughNorthallertonRiponScarboroughSheffieldSkiptonWakefieldWhitbyYork

Divisions Diocese of Ripon and LeedsEast Riding of YorkshireList of wapentakes in YorkshireNorth Riding of YorkshireNorth YorkshireSouth YorkshireWest Riding of YorkshireWest YorkshireYorkshire and the Humber

Culture: Yorkshire dialectWhite Rose of YorkOn Ilkla Moor Baht 'atYorkshire SocietyYorkshire TeaYorkshire Ridings SocietyParkin (cake)Pontefract CakesSaddleworth White Rose SocietyYorkshire DayNewspapers of Yorkshire

Organisations: Army Foundation College Harrogate • Association of Nail Technicians ARTTS InternationalBettys and Taylors of HarrogateBlack Sheep BreweryHenlys GroupRAF Linton-on-OuseScouting in Central YorkshireYorkshire Wildlife TrustYorkshire RegimentYorkshire Air AmbulanceTheakston BreweryRooster's BreweryRAF LeconfieldRockingham Pottery

Geography: Geology of YorkshireRiver RawtheyGrass Wood, WharfedaleBarbon BeckDamflask ReservoirPugneys Country ParkYorkshire DalesAgden ReservoirEccup ReservoirRead's IslandSkipton WoodsPeak DistrictDriffield NavigationNorth York Moors

People: Gascoigne familyHigh Sheriff of YorkshireLord Lieutenant of HumbersideLord Lieutenant of Yorkshire

Governance: West Riding of Yorkshire (UK Parliament constituency)Leeds (UK Parliament constituency)Barkston Ash (UK Parliament constituency)Humberside PoliceYorkshire ForwardYorkshire (UK Parliament constituency)

History: DeifrForest of GaltresJorvikThornborough HengesWar of the Roses

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